Monday, September 19, 2022

Comics: Bob Lander, Letterer and Inker


Bob Lander was born Robert Charles Cohen on August 15, 1920, in Jersey City, New Jersey, according to his World War II draft card. However, census records had Charles as his first name. He was the second of three children born to Jacob Cohen and Rose Frank who married on January 21, 1917 in Brooklyn. 

In the 1920 U.S. Federal Census, Lander’s parents and sister were Brooklyn residents at 120 Grove Street. His father was a bookkeeper at a cigar manufacturer. 


The 1925 New York state census recorded the Cohen family of five in Brooklyn at 699 East New York Avenue. 


According to the 1930 census, the Cohen family resided at 971 47th Street in Brooklyn. 


In Alter Ego #90, December 2009, Leon Lazarus was interviewed by Jim Amash. (Pages 48 and 54 have photographs of Lander.) Lazarus said “Bob Landers* was my brother Harry’s brother-in-law. I had known him since I was 17.” On Christmas day 1938, Lander’s older sister, Evelyn, married Harry Joseph Lazarus, the middle brother of Sidney and Leon, who all worked in comics at various times. 

The 1940 census said Lander, his parents and younger sister, Adele, lived in Brooklyn at 356 Clifton Place. This location is about two-and-a-half miles west of Bushwick High School which Lander may have attended. He had some college education. Lander’s occupation was a record clerk at a shirt factory. He earned $480 working 32 weeks in 1939.


On February 15, 1942, Lander signed his World War II draft card. His Brooklyn address was 4307 12th Avenue. At the time he was unemployed. His description was five feet nine inches, 155 pounds, with brown hair and green eyes. It’s not known if he served during the war. 

On September 21, 1943, Lander and Hadassah Cohen obtained a marriage license. They married on September 26 in Manhattan. Lazarus’ wife, Marjorie, said Lander “met his wife while trying to become an actor.” Lazarus said Lander “landed a walk-on part in the movie Stage Door Canteen.”

Noted on Lander’s draft card was the date, February 15, 1946, when his surname was updated from Cohen to Lander.


In 1946 Lander was employed at Timely Comics where he was a letterer. He was credited in two issues of Terry Toons, numbers 47 and 48. Information about his art training has not been found.

Terry Toons #47, August 1946

In an interview at Timely-Atlas-Comics, Allen Bellman said “Bob Landers* was a letterer who sat opposite me. There was a time that the office did not have air-conditioning and I always sat next to the window. Bob used to open it all the time and the wind blew in my ear constantly and caused my Bell’s Palsy.” 

Some of Lander’s comics credits are at the Grand Comics Database. (Please note, fourteen-year-old Lander did not contribute to New Fun #2, March 1935.) Who’s Who of American Comics Books 1928–1999 also has credits. 

Lander’s address in the 1950 census was 1346 Grant Avenue, apartment 2E, in the Bronx. He was a freelance artist with a wife and two daughters. Lazarus said “He was a very good letterer who taught me how to letter, and he was also an inker. When Timely let us all go, he left comics. Later on, he went to work for Esso, which is now Exxon. Before either Bob or I was married, we used to double-date. He had two daughters.” 


According to Florida records at Ancestry.com, Lander divorced Hadassah and married Charliann A. Ronson Young in August 1959. This was her second marriage, too. How Lander met Young could be explained in the 1957 Manhattan, New York City directory. Lander and Young (listed under her maiden name Ronson) resided one block from each other on West 21st Street. He was at building number 473 and she at 328.


The Catalog of Copyright Entries, Third Series, Volume 23, Parts 7–11A, Number 1, World of Art, January–June 1969 had an entry for someone who might be Lander. 
Lander, Robert.
Chessboard and full complement of chess pieces. [Abstract figures] Plaster & wood. Appl. ti.: Chess game, board and 6 pieces. © Robert Lander; 28Jan69; GP61679.
Standard Oil Company published a company magazine called The Lamp. The Winter 1971 issue included a photograph by Lander. A map by Lander appeared in a 1977 issue. 

In 1974 Lander and his wife were registered voters in Manhattan according to the Board of Elections in the City of New York

Charliann passed away on May 29, 1990. She was a World War II veteran who served from February 28, 1943 to March 21, 1946. The Social Security Death Index said her last residence was East Hampton, New York. 

Lander passed away on October 29, 2003. The Social Security Death Index said his last residence was Honesdale, Pennsylvania.

* All documentation had Lander as the surname. Lazarus and Bellman called him Landers.


Related Posts


(Next post on Monday: Comic Book Trademarks, Part 13)

Monday, September 12, 2022

Comics: Artist Lily Renée in the 1940s and Early 1950s


Lily Renée Willheim was born on May 12, 1921, in Vienna, Austria, according to her Declaration of Intention naturalization application at Ancestry.com. Lily’s parents were Rudolph Willheim (1891–1958) and Else (Elsa) Goldstein (1895–1973). 

Trina Robbins’ interview with Lily was published in The Comics Journal, November 29, 2006. Lily talked about her early life and explained how her parents came to America. 

Lilys overseas travel was documented on a passenger list. She was 18 years old and aboard the steamship MV Georgic which departed Liverpool, England on January 30, 1940. She arrived in the port of New York on February 11, 1940. According the passenger list, Lily had been staying at Bloomsbury House. Her destination was 205 West 87 Street, New York, New York, where her father resided. 


Lily is on line seven.

The 1940 United States Census recorded Lily and her father at 129 West 86th Street, Manhattan, New York City. He was a bank bookkeeper and she an artist. The whereabouts of her mother is not known.


On July 3, 1940 Lily began the naturalization process when she filed a Declaration of Intention. 


Lily’s comics career started in 1942. 

Lily and Ernest Siegfried Meyer obtained a Manhattan marriage license on November 18, 1944. They married on November 23, 1944. The marriage ended in divorce. Meyer was born on January 5, 1914, in Langenfield, Germany. He passed away February 28, 1994, in New York. 





Lily became a naturalized citizen on September 6, 1945. 


In 1946 she married Eric Andrew Peters in New Jersey. Earlier he had married Susanne Stierstadt on January 5, 1940 in Queens, New York. The 1940 census said he was self-employed cartoonist (who contributed to Colliers and The Saturday Evening Post). Peters was born on May 12, 1899 in Vienna, Austria (World War II draft card) and passed away in September 1979.  


The 1950 census said Lily and Peters lived at 143-50 Hoover Avenue in Queens, New York. Both were freelance artists working in the magazine field. In 1952 their divorce was finalized in Dade County, Florida. 


In 1953 Lily married Randolph Godfrey Phillips in Manhattan, New York City. The couple were issued license number 15407 on June 23, 1953; see pages 1267 for Phillips and 1720 for Lily. During World War II Phillips served in the Army. Lily and Phillips had a daughter and son. Phillips’ obituary was published in the New York Daily News, October 12, 1982 (below), and Columbia College Today, Spring 1983. 
Randolph Godfrey Phillips, 71, a financial consultant who challenged some of the nation’s largest corporations on behalf of their stockholders, died Sunday at Lenox Hill Hospital after a long illness. 

Though not a lawyer, Phillips once argued in front of the United States Supreme Court and in 1977 unsuccessfully sued the Justice Department in an effort to nullify President Ford’s pardon of Richard Nixon.

A financial reporter for the New York Herald Tribune and New York World-Telegram in the 1930s, and later a speechwriter for New York Gov. Thomas E. Dewey, Phillips was graduated from Columbia University in 1931. He is survived by his wife and two children. 
Lily passed away on August 24, 2022, in New York City.


Further Reading
The New York Times, September 14, 2022, Lily Renée Phillips, Pioneering Comic Book Artist, Dies at 101 
Lily Renée, Escape Artist: From Holocaust Survivor to Comic Book PioneerTrina Robbins, Illustrated by Anne Timmons and Mo Oh, Graphic Universe, 2011
Fritz Ascher, Lily Renée (1921–2022): From Refugee to Renown
In My Not So Humble Opinion, Happy 100th birthday to Lily Renée
The Times of Israel, Overlooked Jewish female artist from comics’ golden age escaped real WWII peril 
Alter Ego, #70, July 2007, “Lily Renée at Fiction House—and Beyond”
Digital Comic Museum, Fiction HouseAbbott and Costello Comics
Newsweek, August 8, 2010 (print edition), “A Real-Life Comic Book Superhero”


(Next post on Monday: Bob Lander, Letterer and Inker)

Monday, August 29, 2022

Comics: Tom Palmer, Artist and Inker


Thomas John “Tom” Palmer was born on July 13, 1941, in Queens, New York, New York, according to the New York, New York Birth Index at Ancestry.com. His parents were Leo Palmer and Frances Maute who obtained a marriage license on October 10, 1929 in Queens. In the 1940 U. S. Census, his parents and brother, William, resided in Queens at 71-64 72nd Place. His father was a contractor.

Palmer’s father signed his World War II draft card on April 26, 1942. His address was 71-17 72nd Street, Glendale, Long Island, New York. He worked at the Star Showcase Company in Brooklyn. 

The 1950 census counted Palmer, his parents and brother in Queens at the same address on the draft card. Palmer’s father did architectural drafting; his mother was an envelope machine operator; and his brother delivered newspapers. 


The Ridgewood Times (New York), September 10, 1953, reported the passing of Palmer’s father.
Leo Palmer, of 71-17 72nd St., Glendale, September 2. Husband of Frances; father of Frances Mohan, Emily Barragry, Joseph, Raymond, John, William and Thomas Palmer; also survived by 7 grandchildren. Funeral held Saturday from George Werst Funeral Home with mass at St. Pancras R. C. Church. Interment St, John’s Cemetery.
The Long Island Star-Journal (Long Island City, New York), June 30, 1955, said Palmer graduated from Public School 119 in Glendale. 


In June 1959 Palmer graduated from Newtown High School in Elmhurst, New York. He was on the Lantern school newspaper art staff.

The Newtowner, June 1959

The Comics Journal published an interview with Palmer on October 21, 2015. Palmer said he attended evening classes at the School of Visual Arts and the Frank J. Reilly School of Art. He also explained how he got into comics. An excerpt from his obituary said 
He got his first big break in 1968 when he landed an assignment for Marvel Comics' Doctor Strange series. After pencilling one issue, Tom was asked to shift his talents to inking. The new penciller for the series was Gene Colan, an artist known for fully-rendered pencil art that was notoriously difficult to ink. Tom wasn't intimidated and applied techniques he learned in art school and various ad agencies to bring a lush, illustrative quality to the finished art. 
Palmer’s credits are at the Grand Comics Database and Who’s Who of American Comic Books 1928–1999. Some of his work can be viewed at Heritage Auctions

The New York, New York Marriage License, at Ancestry.com, said Palmer and Ann Louise Tienken obtained a Queens marriage license in 1965.

In the mid-1970s, Palmer moved to Oakland, New Jersey.

The Glendale Register (New York), February 8, 1979, reported the passing of Palmer’s mother.
Frances Palmer
Mass of Christian Burial was offered at St. Pancras R.C. Church. Interment followed in St. John’s Cemetery, under, the direction of the George Werst Funeral Home, Inc., 71-41 Cooper Ave.

Mrs. Palmer died on Jan. 31st. She leaves two sons, William and Thomas; two daughters. Frances Mohan and Sister Emily Palmer OSM; one sister, Anna Hutter; one brother, Conrad Maute; fourteen grandchildren and one great-granddaughter. Mrs. Palmer was a resident of Glendale.
Palmer passed away on August 18, 2022, in Oakland, New Jersey. An obituary is here


Further Reading and Viewing
Comics Book Artist #3, Winter 1999, The Art of Inking Neal Adams 
Comic Book Historians, Tom Palmer Interview, Text and Video


(Next post on Monday: Trylon and Perisphere Variations)

Monday, August 22, 2022

Monday, August 15, 2022

Creator: Alex Jay’s Comic Book and Comics-Related Logos, Lettering and Graphic Designs


Published works are presented in more or less alphabetical order. In
most cases, the first appearance of the works are shown. Following 
the titles are the people who commissioned the work, the publisher 
or client, and the year of publication.


THE ADVENTURES OF SUPERMAN
Richard Bruning, Design Director, DC Comics, 1987 

































AGENTS OF LAW
Marilee Hord, Editor, Dark Horse Comics, 1995

































AIRTIGHT GARAGE
Marie Javins, Editor, Epic Comics, 1993
The making of the logo is here and here

































ALPHA CENTURION
Georg Brewer, Design Director, DC Comics, 1996

































AMERICAN FLAGG!
Howard Chaykin, Creator, First Comics, 1983
 
































ARMAGEDDON: 2001
Curtis King, Art Director, DC Comics, 1991

































ARMAGEDDON: THE ALIEN AGENDA
Curtis King, Art Director, DC Comics, 1991

































ARMAGEDDON: INFERNO
Curtis King, Art Director, DC Comics, 1992

































ARSENAL
Georg Brewer, Design Director, DC Comics, 1998

































THE ART OF MOEBIUS
Byron Preiss, Editor, Berkley Books, 1989
Alex Jay used the typeface ITC Eras for the book; book designed by Robbin 
Brosterman.

































AVATAR
Curtis King, Art Director, DC Comics, 1991



































THE BANK STREET BOOK OF CREEPY TALES
Byron Preiss, Editor
Pocket Books, 1989
There was no budget for hand-lettered logos so the titles were typeset. 
The four books of comics are approximately digest-size.

































THE BANK STREET BOOK OF FANTASY

































THE BANK STREET BOOK OF MYSTERY

































THE BANK STREET BOOK OF SCIENCE FICTION

































BATMAN
Curtis King, Art Director, DC Comics, 1993
Two different covers for issue #500































































BATMAN & DRACULA
Robbin Brosterman, Art Director, DC Comics, 1992



































BATMAN: CASTLE OF THE BAT
Robbin Brosterman, Art Director, DC Comics, 1994



































BATMAN: DEMON
Robbin Brosterman, Art Director, DC Comics, 1996



































BATMAN: GORDON‘S LAW
Curtis King, Art Director, DC Comics, 1996



































BATMAN: HOLY TERROR
Robbin Brosterman, Art Director, DC Comics, 1991



































BATMAN PHANTOM STRANGER
Robbin Brosterman, Art Director, DC Comics, 1997



































BATMAN: PREY
Robbin Brosterman, Art Director, DC Comics, 1990



































BATMAN: SHAMAN
Robbin Brosterman, Art Director, DC Comics, 1993



































BATMAN: STRANGE APPARITIONS
Robbin Brosterman, Art Director, DC Comics, 1999



































BLACKMASK
Robbin Brosterman, Art Director, DC Comics, 1993



































BLOODY MARY
Georg Brewer, Design Director, DC Comics/Helix, 1996



































BUCKY O'HARE
Larry Hama, Creator, Continuity Comics, 1986

































BUCKY O’HARE
Larry Hama, Creator; Neal Adams, Publisher, Continuity Comics, 1991
Main character originally named Buck Bunny. 

































CAGE
Marc McLaurin, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1992

































CALEB HAMMER
Jim Salicrup, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1980
Referral from Tom Orzechowski; “The Coming of” added by 
another letterer

































CAP’N QUCIK & A FOOZLE
Marshall Rogers, Creator, Eclipse Comics, 1984
Marshall Rogers furnished his logo sketch 

































CATWOMAN: HER SISTER’S KEEPER
Robbin Brosterman, Art Director, DC Comics, 1991
“Her Sister’s Keeper” was typeset.

































CATWOMAN DEFIANT
Robbin Brosterman, Art Director, DC Comics, 1992
“Defiant” was typeset.

































CATWOMAN
The 1992 title lettering was used for the 1993 series logo. 

































CINDER AND ASHE
Richard Bruning, Design Director, DC Comics, 1988

































CLASH!
Robbin Brosterman, Art Director, DC Comics, 1991
































Back cover detail: originally the viper heads art was part of the logo. 

































CLIVE BARKER'S THE HARROWERS
Marc McLaurin, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1993
“Raiders of the Abyss” was added by another letterer.

































CLIVE BARKER’S HELLRAISER
Dan Chichester, Editor, Epic Comics, 1989

































CODENAME: SPITFIRE
Bob Harras, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1987

































CODY STARBUCK
Designed by Neal Adams; finished by Alex Jay
Howard Chaykin’s new Cody Starbuck story was picked up by Neal Adams’ 
Continuity Comics. Beginning in 1981 the story was serialized in Heavy 
Metal, numbers 50 through 54.

































THE COMPLETE JACK KIRBY
Greg Theakston, Publisher, Pure Imagination, 1997
The making of the logo is here.

































CONAN SAGA
Larry Hama, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1988

































CONTINUITY COMICS
Neal Adams, Art Director, 1982
Originally the flat edges of the uppercase C were perpendicular to 
the baseline. In 1991, someone changed the angles of the edges. 

































COSMIC ODYSSEY
Richard Bruning, Art Director, DC Comics, 1988

































COSMIC POWERS
Craig Anderson, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1994
“Thanos” created by another letterer

































COSMIC POWERS UNLIMITED ... STARRING
Mark Gruenwald, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1995
“The Silver Surfer” created by another letterer.

































COUNT DRACULA
Neal Adams, Publisher, Continuity Comics, 1981
Logo based on the typeface Hoffman; debuted in Echo of Futurepast 
#5, April 1985; reprinted in Neal Adams Monsters, Vanguard 
Productions, 2003



























CROSSOVER CLASSICS: THE MARVEL/DC COLLECTION
Robbin Brosterman, Art Director, Marvel Comics, 1991

































THE CRUSADERS
Michael Golden, Artist, DC Comics, 1992

































CBS SATURDAY
Neal Adams, Art Director; TV Guide, September 1978
Alex Jay did production work (making tint overlays) on these advertisements.



































DARKHOLD: PAGES FROM THE BOOK OF SINS
Bobbie Chase, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1992
First issue did not use the subtitle; logo previewed in Ghost Rider #25

































DC ARCHIVE EDITIONS: SUPERMAN ARCHIVES VOLUME 1
Richard Bruning, Design Director, DC Comics, 1989
Series design by Alex Jay; Kabello Extra Bold and Metro are the
principal typefaces.

































DC ARCHIVE EDITIONS: BATMAN ARCHIVES VOLUME 1
Richard Bruning, Design Director, DC Comics, 1990
Series design by Alex Jay; Kabello Extra Bold and Metro are the
principal typefaces.

































DCU HEROES SECRET FILES & ORIGINS
Georg Brewer, Design Director, DC Comics, 1999
“DCU Heroes” by Alex Jay

































DCU VILLAINS SECRET FILES & ORIGINS
Georg Brewer, Design Director, DC Comics, 1999
“DCU Villains” by Alex Jay

































DOCTOR ZERO: THE SHADOW LINE SAGA
Archie Goodwin, Editor, Dan Chichester, Writer, Epic Comics, 1988

































ECHO OF FUTUREPAST
Neal Adams, Publisher, Continuity Comics, 1984
Designed by Neal Adams; finished art by Alex Jay

































ECTOKID
Marc McLaurin, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1993
Sketch furnished to Alex Jay to finish. 

































ECTOKID UNLEASHED
Marc McLaurin, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1994
“Unleashed” added by another letterer.

































ELRIC
Walt Simonson, Artist, DC Comics, 1988
“Michael Moorcock’s” and “The Making of a Sorcerer” were set in a 
typeface designed by Alex Jay. 

































ELSEWORLD’S FINEST
Robbin Brosterman, Art Director, DC Comics, 1997

































EMPIRE
Byron Preiss, Editor, Berkley, 1978

































ERADICATOR
Georg Brewer, Design Director, DC Comics, 1996

































EXCALIBUR
Terry Kavanaugh, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1992

































THE FALL OF THE MUTANTS
Ann Nocenti, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1988
Crossover logo for The New Mutants #59-61; The Uncanny X-Men 
#225-227; and X-Factor #24-26

































FANTASY ILLUSTRATED
Richard Howell, Editor, New Media Publishing, 1982
referral from Tom Orzechowski

































THE FINAL NIGHT
Georg Brewer, Design Director, DC Comics, 1996

































FIRESTAR
Ann Nocenti, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1986

































FORBIDDEN PLANET
Michael Luckman, Proprietor, New York City, 1982
Letterhead

































FORBIDDEN PLANET
Michael Luckman, Proprietor, New York City, 1984
Letterhead and shopping bag with art by Brian Bolland. The making of the 
logo is here and here.


































FRANKENSTEIN
Neal Adams, Publisher, Continuity Comics, 1981
Logo based on a typeface; debuted in Echo of Futurepast #1, May 1984; 
reprinted in Neal Adams Monsters, Vanguard Productions, 2003


























FROM AARGH! TO ZAP! Harvey Kurtzman’s Visual History of the Comics
Harvey Kurtzman and Byron Preiss, Editors, Prentice Hall Press, 1991
“From Aargh! to Zap!” by Alex Jay

































THE FURIES
Byron Preiss, Editor
The Illustrated Roger Zelazny, Baronet Publishing, 1978

































GEN 13 INTERACTIVE
Mike Heisler, Editor, Image/Wildstorm Comics, 1997
“Interactive” added by another letterer

































GOBOTRON GREETINGS
Greg Leeds, Design Director, Gobots Magazine, 1986
Lettering and design by Alex Jay; robot art by Ralph Reese

































GODOT ACTION COMICS
David Vogler, Art Director
The Book of Sequels, Random House, 1990

































THE GREAT GRIMMAX
Jim Shooter, Editor, Defiant Comics, 1994

































THE GREEN LANTERN CORPS
Richard Bruning, Design Director, DC Comics, 1986
The making of the logo is here.

































GRIFFIN
Robbin Brosterman, Art Director, DC Comics, 1991

































HAMMER OF GOD: PENTATHLON
Anina Bennett, Editor, Dark Horse Comics, 1994
“Pentathlon” added by another letterer; logo also used on Hammer 
of God: Butch, 1994. The making of the logo is here

































HARVEY KURTZMAN’S STRANGE ADVENTURES
Harvey Kurtzman and Byron Preiss, Editors, Epic, 1990

































HAVOK & WOLVERINE: MELTDOWN
Robbin Brosterman, Art Director, Marvel Comics, 1988

































HAYWIRE
Andy Helfer, Editor, DC Comics, 1988

































HEARTBREAKERS
Anina Bennett, Editor, Dark Horse Comics, 1996

































HEAVY HITTERS
Marie Javins, Editor, Epic Comics, 1993
Brand logo debuted May 1993 and appeared on several titles.

































HELLRAISER NIGHTBREED JIHAD
Robbin Brosterman, Art Director, Epic Comics, 1991

































THE HUNTRESS
Andy Helfer, Editor, DC Comics, 1989

































HYPERKIND UNLEASHED
Marc McLaurin, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1994
Original title was Hyperkind the New Heroes; logo digitally stretched; 
“Unleashed” added by another letterer.

































THE ILLUSTRATED HARLAN ELLISON
Byron Preiss, Editor, Baronet Publishing, 1978

































I’M LOOKING FOR KADAK
The Illustrated Harlan Ellison, Baronet Publishing, 1978



































INCREDIBLE HULK-HERCULES UNLEASHED
Mark Gruenwald, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1996

































INVASION! THE ALLIEN ALLIANCE
Andy Helfer, Editor, DC Comics, 1988

































INVASION! BATTLEGROUND EARTH
Andy Helfer, Editor, DC Comics, 1988

































INVASION! WORLD WITHOUT HEROES
Andy Helfer, Editor, DC Comics, 1988

































INVASION FIRST STRIKE! EXTRA!
Andy Helfer, Editor, DC Comics, 1988
Appeared on Holiday 1988 issues

































INVASION AFTERMATH EXTRA!
Andy Helfer, Editor, DC Comics, 1989
Appeared on January 1988 issues

































IRONWOLF: FIRES OF THE REVOLUTION
Robbin Brosterman, Art Director, DC Comics, 1992
The making of the logo is here.



































JACK KIRBY’S HEROES AND VILLAINS
Greg Theakston, Publisher; Pure Imagination, 1987


































JHEREG: THE GRAPHIC NOVEL
Byron Preiss, Editor, Epic, 1990
“Jhereg” was set in a typeface designed by Alex Jay. 


































JLA
Georg Brewer, Design Director, DC Comics, 1997


































JLA: A LEAGUE OF ONE
Amie Brockway, Art Director, DC Comics, 2000


































JUSTICE LEAGUE AMERICA
Andy Helfer, Editor, DC Comics, 1989


































JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA: THE NAIL
Georg Brewer, Design Director, DC Comics, 1998
Title and Justice League of America seal by Alex Jay


































JUSTICE LEAGUE EUROPE
Curtis King, Art Director, DC Comics, 1989


































JUSTICE LEAGUE INTERNATIONAL
Andy Helfer, Editor, DC Comics, 1987


































JUSTICE LEAGUE QUARTERLY
Andy Helfer, Editor, DC Comics, 1990


































JUSTICE LEAGUE TASK FORCE
Curtis King, Art Director, DC Comics, 1993



































A KNIGHT IN BLUDHAVEN
Robbin Brosterman, Art Director, DC Comics, 1998
“Nightwing” created by another letterer.


































LAST OF THE DRAGONS
Carl Potts, Creator
Logo created for Neal Adams. In 1982 the logo appeared in Epic Illustrated
numbers 15 to 20. In 1988 Epic Comics published the graphic novel with a 
cover logo by Jim Novak. 


































LEGENDS: THE COLLECTION
Robbin Brosterman, Art Director, DC Comics, 1993


































LORDS OF THE ULTRA-REALM
Richard Bruning, Design Director, DC Comics, 1986


































LUCIFER
Amie Brockway, Art Director, Vertigo/DC Comics, 1999


































MACHINE MAN
Larry Hama, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1984


































MAGIK
Louise Simonson, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1983
The making of the logo is here.


































THE MAN OF STEEL
Richard Bruning, Design Director, DC Comics, 1986


































THE MAN OF STEEL
Richard Bruning, Design Director, DC Comics, 1986
Newsstand version


































MARTIAN MANHUNTER
Andy Helfer, Editor, DC Comics, 1988


































MARVEL: FIVE FABULOUS DECADES OF THE WORLD'S GREATEST COMICS
David Vogler, Art Director, Abrams, 1991
The making of the logo is here, here, here and here.


































MARVEL MAGAZINE GROUP
In 1980 Jim Shooter hired Neal Adams to create cover brand designs for 
Marvel’s magazines. Neal asked Alex Jay to work on the project. Alex’s 
design with the hand-lettered branding (black-and-white). Marvel’s typeset 
branding appeared beginning with Bizarre Adventures #25, March 1981; The 
Savage Sword of Conan #63, April 1981; and The Hulk! #27, June 1981.



































MARVEL SUPER HEROES COLORFORMS PLAY SET
Neal Adams, Art Director, 1983
“Colorforms Play Set” was typeset and overlaid the perspective
lines. The making of the logo is here


































MARVEL SUPER HEROES ADVENTURE SET
Neal Adams, Art Director, 1979


































THE MASTERWORKS SERIES OF GREAT COMIC BOOK 
ARTISTS
Phil Seuling, Creator, DC Comics and Sea Gate, 1983
Series logo was typeset; artist’s name produced by a DC staff letterer


































MEZZ GALACTIC TOUR 2493
Anina Bennett, Editor, Dark Horse Comics, 1994
The making of the logo is here.


































THE MIGHTY THOR
Walt Simonson, Artist, Marvel Comics, 1983
The making of the logo is here, here, here, here, here, here, here
and here


































THE MIGHTY THOR: I, WHOM THE GODS WOULD DESTROY
Jo Duffy, Editor, Marvel, 1987
First appearance of the modified "T" in Thor.


































MISTER MIRACLE
Curtis King, Art Director, DC Comics, 1996


































MORBIUS: THE LIVING VAMPIRE
Bobbie Chase, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1992
First issue did not use the subtitle; logo previewed in Ghost Rider #25

































MORE THAN HUMAN
Byron Preiss, Editor, Heavy Metal, 1978

































MY LIFE AS A CARTOONIST
Harvey Kurtzman, Pocket Books, 1988
Series design by Alex Jay

































THE NAZZ
Karen Berger, Editor, Vertigo Comics, 1990

































NEAL ADAMS MONSTERS
Vanguard Productions, 2003
Trade paperback edition with Frankenstein, Count Dracula and Werewolf logos 
by Alex Jay; the hardcover edition had a cover design without the the logos.
The making of the logos is here.

































NEUROMANCER: THE GRAPHIC NOVEL
Byron Preiss, Editor, Epic, 1989

































NEW GODS
Curtis King, Art Director, DC Comics, 1995
The making of the logo is here.

































THE NEW GUARDIANS
Andy Helfer, Editor, DC Comics, 1988

































THE NEW MUTANTS
Ann Nocenti, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1985

































NIGHT FORCE
Georg Brewer, Design Director, DC Comics, 1996

































NIGHTSTALKERS
Bobbie Chase, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1992
Logo was digitally stretched; logo previewed in Ghost Rider #25

































NTH MAN THE ULTIMATE NINJA
Larry Hama, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1989

































NUTS!
Harvey Kurtzman and Byron Preiss, Editors, Bantam, 1985
Mass market paperback

































OMAC
Robbin Brosterman, Art Director, DC Comics, 1991

































ON SALE HERE
Janice Walker, Special Projects, DC Comics, 1989

































OPEN SPACE
Carol Kalish, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1989
Original title was Ad Astra.

































ORION
Walt Simonson, Artist, DC Comics, 2000

































PARALLAX EMERALD NIGHT
Curtis King, Art Director, DC Comics, 1996

































PENGUIN TRIUMPHANT
Robbin Brosterman, Art Director, DC Comics, 1992
“Triumphant” was typeset.

































THE POWER OF SHAZAM!
Robbin Brosterman, Art Director, DC Comics, 1994

































POWERLINE: A SHADOWLINE SAGA
Archie Goodwin, Editor; Dan Chichester, Writer, Epic Comics, 1988

































QUICKSILVER
Mark Gruenwald, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1996
Scan of original art produced a defective Q. The making of the logo 
is here.

































THE RING OF THE NIBELUNG
Andy Helfer, Editor; Curtis King, Art Director, DC Comics, 1989
The making of the logo is here and here.

































RISE OF THE MIDNIGHT SONS
Bobbie Chase, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1992
Crossover logo used on Ghost Rider #28, Part 1; Spirits of Vengeance: 
Ghost Rider & Blaze #1, Part 2; Morbius the Living Vampire #1, 
Part 3; Darkhold: Pages from the Book of Sins #1, Part 4; 
Nightstalkers #1, Part 5; and Ghost Rider #31, Part 6

































SACHS & VIOLENS
Marie Javins, Editor, Epic Comics, 1993

































ST. GEORGE: A SHADOWLINE SAGA
Archie Goodwin, Editor; Dan Chichester, Writer, Epic Comics, 1988

































SAINT SINNER
Marc McLaurin, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1993

































SAVAGE TALES
Larry Hama, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1985
Logo’s metallic surface airbrushed by Gary Hallgren.

































SECRET ORIGINS
Richard Bruning, Design Director, DC Comics, 1986

































SECRET ORIGINS
Richard Bruning, Design Director, DC Comics, 1986

































SHADOW DRAGON
Georg Brewer, Design Director, DC Comics, 1995

































SHATTER
Fred Dodnick, Production Manager; Fawcett Columbine, 1988
Book design by Alex Jay included a divider, repeated in different 
colors, for the eleven “down loads” of the graphic novel. Logo by
Michael Saenz.

































SHEVA’S WAR
Amie Brockway, Art Director, DC Comics/Helix, 1998

































SILVER SABLE & THE WILD PACK
Craig Anderson, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1992

































SILVER SURFER
Marshall Rogers, Artist, Marvel Comics, 1987

































SKULL & BONES
Jim Chadwick, Art Director, DC Comics, 1992

































THE SPECTRE
Dan Thorsland, Editor, DC Comics, 1992

































SPELLBOUND
Bobbie Chase, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1988

































SPIRITS OF VENGEANCE
Bobbie Chase, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1992
Logo previewed in Ghost Rider #25; appeared on Spirits of Vengeance 
Keepsake Collection envelope and T-shirts. 
































Logo was modified and redrawn by another letterer.

































SPYKE
Marie Javins, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1993
The making of the logo is here.

































STARMAN
Curtis King, Art Director, DC Comics, 1994

































ALFRED BESTER’S THE STARS MY DESTINATION VOLUME 1
Byron Preiss, Editor, Baronet Publishing
1978 advertisement with an early version of the logo. 

































ALFRED BESTER’S THE STARS MY DESTINATION VOLUME 1
Byron Preiss, Editor, Baronet Publishing, 1979

































THE COMPLETE ALFRED BESTER’S THE STARS MY DESTINATION
Byron Preiss, Editor, Epic, 1992

































STEELTOWN ROCKERS
Larry Hama, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1990

































STRANGE TALES
Carl Potts, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1987
Character logos by other letterers

































STREETWISE
John Morrow, Publisher; Jon B. Cooke, Editor, TwoMorrows, 2000

































STRIKEFORCE: MORITURI
Carl Potts, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1986

































SUPERMAN: END OF THE CENTURY
Georg Brewer, Design Director, DC Comics, 2003
All hand-lettered except writer and artist credits which were typeset. 

































SUPERMAN FOR ALL SEASONS
Robbin Brosterman, Art Director, DC Comics, 1999
"For All Seasons" was typeset. 

































SUPERMAN: WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE MAN OF 
TOMORROW?
Robbin Brosterman, Art Director, DC Comics, 1997
Title except question mark hand-lettered by Alex Jay.

































SUPERMAN'S METROPOLIS
Robbin Brosterman, Art Director, DC Comics, 1996
“Metropolis” was based on the 1927 film poster lettering.

































TAKION
Georg Brewer, Design Director, DC Comics, 1996

































TALES OF THE DARK KNIGHT
Rita Kesler, Ballantine Books Editor; Joe Orlando, DC Special Projects 
Editor, Ballantine Books, 1989
Color cover concept sketch by Alex Jay. Joe Orlando changed the 
position of Batman’s body and sent his tight pencil drawing to illustrator 
Sigmund Pifko.


































TIMBER WOLF
Curtis King, Art Director, DC Comics, 1992
Curtis King furnished his design for Alex Jay to finish. 

































TIME MACHINE
Byron Preiss, Editor, Bantam Books, 1984
The figure entering the time portal was inspired by Steve Ditko’s 
Doctor Strange entering an interdimensional portal. Cover 
painting by Jim Steranko. The making of the logo is here.



























TOYBOY
Neal Adams, Art Director, Continuity Comics, 1986
Designed by Neal Adams; finished art by Alex Jay. The making of 
the logo is here

































TWILIGHT
Andy Helfer, Editor, DC Comics, 1990

































UNAMERICAN GLADIATORS
Curtis King, Art Director, DC Comics, 1993
“Lobo” logo created by another letterer.

































UNCANNY ORIGINS
Mark Gruenwald, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1996
“Cyclops” logo created by another letterer. The making of the logo 
is here

































VENGEANCE
Chris Cooper, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1994
Logo debuted in Midnights Sons, Marvel Comics Presents #147, 
February 1994

































WAR DANCER
Alan Weiss, Creator, Defiant Comics, 1994
Original line art was used as a guide for the airbrush art.

































WARLOCK AND THE INFINITY WATCH
Craig Anderson, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1993

































THE WARLOCK CHRONICLES
Craig Anderson, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1993

































WEREWOLF
Neal Adams, Art Director, Continuity Comics, 1981
Logo debuted in Echo of Futurepast #3, November 1984; 
reprinted in Neal Adams Monsters, Vanguard Productions, 2003



























WILL TO POWER
Marilee Hord, Editor, Dark Horse Comics, 1994

































WOLFPACK
Ann Nocenti, Editor, Marvel, 1988
Logo debuted on the graphic novel. The making of the logo is here


































WONDER WOMAN
Curtis King, Art Director, DC Comics, 1992

































WONDERAMA
Greg Theakston, Publisher, Pure Imagination, 1993

































X-FACTOR
Walt Simonson, Artist, Marvel Comics, 1986
The making of the logo is here.

































X-FORCE
Bob Harras, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1991
The making of the logo is here
































Logo with bold outline

































X-TERMINATORS
Bob Harras, Editor, Marvel Comics, 1988

































ZATANNA
Curtis King, Art Director, DC Comics, 1993

































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